Bill seeks to make little-known Vernal homeless shelter eligible for state grants


SALT LAKE CITY — Utah lawmakers targeted so much on homeless shelter reform and the construction of three new homeless resource facilities in Salt Lake County when enacting laws in recent times, somewhat-recognized homeless shelter in japanese Utah was forgotten.

Sure — there’s a 27-mattress homeless shelter in Vernal, Turning Point Shelter, run by Uintah County.

So Rep. Scott Chew, R-Jensen, is sponsoring a bill to incorporate in laws that shelter — which, because of its measurement, at present isn’t eligible to apply for state homeless grants.

Vernal’s shelter was inadvertently omitted of laws written just lately to permit homeless shelters to apply for public safety mitigation funds and other grants. Presently, the regulation requires shelters to have 50 beds or more.

“We don’t qualify for any funding, but we want to care for our personal,” Chew stated in front of the Home Financial Improvement and Workforce Providers Committee on Wednesday.

Home Majority Chief Francis Gibson, R-Mapleton, jokingly grilled Chew about his invoice earlier than expressing his help.

“The statute says you’ve got a bunch of cash here however you possibly can only go after any of that cash when you’ve got a 50-mattress shelter,” Gibson stated. “However in the meantime, you are protecting the individuals which are there … making an attempt to get them again on their ft, hold them in Vernal, and you are not delivery them to Salt Lake?

“And in return, you are asking to have entry to a grant (fund) that you simply’re already paying into?” Gibson continued, before shaking his head and addressing the remainder of the committee. “Representatives, this bill ought to be a consent bill.”

In recent times, state leaders have urged communities aside from Salt Lake City, Midvale, Ogden and now South Salt Lake to do their part to help with homelessness, including rural communities. Gibson, who performed a task in final yr’s legislation, thanked Vernal for its efforts earlier than motioning the committee to endorse the bill.

“To assume you’d step up and do this, that is an enormous dedication out of your group,” Gibson stated.

The bill now goes to the complete House for consideration.



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